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Archives for: February 2010


Fortune, 2/5/2010
Meltzer summarizes Greenspan’s legacy, as he sees it
Alan Greenspan will be remembered for maintaining a long period of low inflation and stable growth with short recessions, says Allan Meltzer, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy. However, Meltzer believes Greenspan’s mistake was considering deflation a problem, which caused him to keep policy “too easy too long.” URL for this article: http://money.cnn.com/2010/02/05/news/economy/greenspan.fortune/index.htm

Fortune, 2/5/2010
Meltzer: Obama administration only partially understands Keynes
The Obama administration has only gotten the theories of British economist John Maynard Keynes partially right, says Allan Meltzer. Meltzer, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy, says the key part of the theory that has been missed is that you can’t run up a large debt without a plan to pay for it. URL for this article: http://money.cnn.com/2010/02/04/news/economy/meltzer_keynes.fortune/index.htm

Wall Street Journal , 2/7/2010
Goodfriend deconstructs Fed policy prior to crisis
The Federal Reserve’s predictable interest rate hikes was a problem, says Marvin Goodfriend, professor of economics; director, The Gailliot Center for Public Policy. Goodfriend, a former economist for the Richmond Fed, says the policy suggested more certainty about the outlook for the economy and rates than actually existed at the time. URL for this article: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703427704575051442884515742.html?mod=WSJ_business_whatsNews

CNBC, 2/8/2010
Miller discusses CIT hiring of former Merrill Lynch chief
Robert Miller, professor of economics and strategy, appeared on CNBC’s “Power Lunch” segment to discuss CIT’s decision to hire former Merrill Lynch chief John Thain as its CEO. URL for this article: http://www.cnbc.com//id/15840232?video=1408108366&play=1

PBS, 2/8/2010
Moore: Overconfidence is an investor coping mechanism
Investors become overconfident to deal with uncertainty, according to Don Moore, Carnegie Bosch Chair; associate professor of organizational behavior & theory. He says because investors lack control over the market, they will resort to overconfidence to compensate. URL for this transcript: http://www.pbs.org/nbr/site/onair/transcripts/investor_overconfidence_100208/

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2/9/2010
Klepper offers test-taking tips
When advising students about succeeding on tests, Steven Klepper goes one further. Klepper, Arthur Arton Hamerschlag Professor of Economics and Social Science, Social and Decision Sciences, College of Humanities and Social Sciences and joint appointment at Tepper School of Business, distributes old exams and suggests students take them in the same amount of time they will get for the real thing. URL for this article: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10040/1034416-298.stm

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, 2/14/2010
Lave estimates storm cost region $1.3 billion
Snowstorms that bombarded Pittsburgh in February could impact the regional economy to the tune of $1.3 billion, according to Lester Lave. Lave, Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Economics and University Professor; director, Carnegie Mellon Green Design Initiative; co-director, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center, predicts two-thirds will be recouped during the next several months. URL for this article: http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/business/s_667137.html

Associated Press , 2/17/2010
Meltzer: China’s shift should be a wake-up call to U.S.
China worries that the United States has unsustainable debt levels, says Allan Meltzer, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy. Meltzer says China’s shift to reduce its stake in U.S. Treasury debt should serve as a wake-up call for Washington, which he says lacks a policy for dealing with the debt levels. URL for this article: http://www.krdotv.com/Global/story.asp?S=11991303&nav=menu552_1_6

Bloomberg TV, 2/17/2010
Goodfriend discusses stimulus package on Bloomberg
Marvin Goodfriend, professor of economics; director, The Gailliot Center for Public Policy, gave an interview to Bloomberg’s Peter Cook about the impact of the stimulus package on the U.S. economy. URL for this article: http://www.silobreaker.com/behravesh-says-stimulus-may-have-saved-2-million-jobs-video-5_2263239153481154560

Electric Light & Power, 2/19/2010
Apt: Industries using natural gas could be priced out of the market
With the cancellation of new coal generation, there will be a substantial increase in the amount of time that natural gas generators will set the market price of electricity, says Jay Apt, executive director of Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center, associate research professor, distinguished service professor in engineering and public policy. Apt says other industries that use natural gas may be priced out of the market. URL for this article: http://www.elp.com/index/display/article-display/1556733182/articles/electric-light-power/volume-88/issue-1/sections/what-price__natural.html

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, 2/21/2010
Meltzer: Higher taxes, entitlement adjustments likely needed to reduce debt
It’s “absolutely critical” that people understand the potential for crisis caused by the federal debt, says Allan Meltzer, The Allan H. Meltzer University Professor of Political Economy. Meltzer says the government will likely have to adjust programs such as Medicare and Social Security and raise taxes to bring its debt under control. URL for this article: http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/business/s_668266.html

NPR, 2/22/2010
NPR interviews Marvin Goodfriend
Marvin Goodfriend, professor of economics; director, The Gailliot Center for Public Policy, appeared on NPR’s “On Point” radio program. The topic was the Federal Reserve’s strategy for handling interest rates. URL for this article: http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/02/fed-rate-reality-check

Bloomberg, 2/22/2010
Spatt: Conflicts surround inquiry into Toyota
Critics may be justified in wondering about the politics behind the controversy surrounding Japanese automaker Toyota, says Chester Spatt, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance; director, Center for Financial Markets. Spatt says observers would be talking about conflict of interest in a private context. URL for this article: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-02-22/toyota-probe-fueled-by-politics-as-well-as-safety-critics-say.html

PBS, 2/22/2010
Investor overconfidence can pose problems, Moore says
Don Moore, Carnegie Bosch Chair; associate professor of organizational behavior & theory, appeared on PBS’ “Nightly Business Report” program to discuss problems associated with investor overconfidence. Moore says overconfidence becomes a problem with investors who believe they have the “magic touch” and don’t need to pay attention to other information sources. URL for this article: http://www.pbs.org/nbr/site/onair/transcripts/nbr_transcripts_100222/

USA Today, 2/24/2010
Miller: Wall Street bonuses typically reflect how well firms are doing
When people are losing their jobs and unemployment is high, Main Street outrage over large Wall Street bonuses is to be expected, says Robert Miller, professor of economics and strategy. However, Miller says his research shows that managers’ compensation reflects how well their firms are doing. http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/brokerage/2010-02-23-wallstreetbonuses_N.htm

Bloomberg, 2/24/2010
Spatt co-authors study recommending SEC requirements
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission should require brokers to include transaction fees and rebates in customer prices to reflect actual trading costs, according to a study co-authored by Chester Spatt, Pamela R. and Kenneth B. Dunn Professor of Finance; director, Center for Financial Markets. Spatt is the former chief economist for the SEC. URL for this article: http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-02-24/brokerage-prices-don-t-reflect-actual-trading-costs-study-says.html

Popular Mechanics, 2/26/2010
Lave: Weatherization is still cost-effective way to save energy
Weatherization is one of the most cost-effective ways of getting energy savings in a house, says Lester Lave, Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Economics and University Professor; director, Carnegie Mellon Green Design Initiative; co-director, Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. Lave says such projects include caulking, insulating, and weatherstripping. URL for this article: http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/home_improvement/4347294.html

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